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Marlan Warren is a free-lance publicist who promotes entertainers and book authors (Roadmap Communications and Book Publicity by Marlan, respectively). She is also a film maker (Roadmap Productions), Reiki Master/Teacher (Light Hands Reiki Studio and Institute), Screenwriter, Novelist, PhotoJournalist, Tai Chi practitioner. 


You can check out but you can never leave...


My life, your life, our lives inside and outside of Los Angeles and its angels.

Sunday, March 18, 2018


I stumbled on this essay that I wrote for Your Life Is A Trip -- The Number 1 Experiential Storytelling and Narrative Travel Writing. I started this blog when I came back to L.A. in 2009, shortly after writing this while still living in San Francisco. 

In 2004, I'd fled L.A.'s madness and stayed away for 5 years, partaking of other lifestyles in Kansas, Missouri and San Francisco before fleeing back into the loving arms of friends I'd made in 20 years of living in Los Angeles. 

Now, 9 years later, I'm at another crossroads. Bridges have been burned. Friendships run their course. Several good friends have been lost to Death.

This past week, I grabbed myself by the ping pongs and jump started my life by taking more actions. The result was quick:

Just by answering a survey that the Los Feliz Ledger sent me on Facebook, I won a $50 gift certificate to The Alcove cafe in the upscale hipness of Hillhurst Ave. I see that as an omen! What does it portend? I have no idea.

I'm learning Spanish with daily lessons and brushing up my French. New skills bring new adventures. Right?

Send me your own take on L.A. these days. Let me know if I have permission to post it on my blog here. Thank you!


"You have to come down if you want your stuff," Beatrice said. "There's termites under the building and I have to fumigate."

I can't remember what I stored with Beatrice while exiting Los Angeles for rural Kansas , but lately I've been missing certain photos, journals and scripts. In ‘04, I fled after 20 years of trying to make a career and happy love life. My friends begged me not to go:

"You're the last person in the world who should move to Kansas !" said my charming boss.

"One thing I'm hearing about where you're going...No available men," said my handsome therapist.

"You won't be able to find a job. People will see you as an outsider. Like when I moved to Florida ," said a well-meaning friend.

I hail from a Florida town that I longed to escape. Left home at 19 and sought my fortunes in Boston, Canada, Chicago, San Diego, and L.A. before two old friends, a mother-daughter duo, talked me into joining them in the middle of nowhere in Central Kansas where they'd moved after doing time in big cities. Nellie and Olga hailed from pioneer stock and had returned to their roots. I was still in search of mine.

I downsized and drove to Lucas , Kan. (pop. 400). Soon my L.A. friends' predictions came true, and instead of settling on the naked prairie, I felt "home" drift even farther out of reach. Still, I found work that I loved within 100-mile radius of Lucas, working for two community newspapers and a PBS-TV station. But that's another story.

My L.A. friends kept in touch. Most liked my fractured tales of the exotic People We Fly Over. But one e-mailed: No more stories of those lug-nut women and their jello creations. That's why I left North Dakota.

In ‘06, my finances tanked so I took a full-time job as a reporter in Missouri and was fired on Day Three. Next came tornadoes. I spent nights on the bathroom floor with my cat waiting for our house to be torn off its foundation and sent sailing through the sky.

At this point, the Dorothy parallels failed to amuse.

My brother in Florida sent me money to move, and an acquaintance in San Francisco advised me that there was a sweet deal on an apartment next to hers. I jumped on it, leaving behind more possessions, and drove back with the cat in the navigator's seat while Joni Mitchell sang, " California , I'm coming home" on the radio.

In San Francisco , most locals view me as a gypsy. A lost human. A stray. They put down their roots long ago and they have enough friends. My creative life has been full. I wrote a play and produced/directed it at a known theater. Now I'm shooting a documentary film. A few Bohemian artists at Caffe Trieste proclaimed me a "good writer." I had an exciting fling with a young man. But internal emptiness remains. My phone doesn't ring much. I don't click with people that way. It's been three years.


Yes, it was in July 2017, and no, I don't know why I didn't  post any video clips or the gorgeous photos I received in January 2018 from actor/playwright/producer Ariel Kayoko Labasan's father before now. But they should not be invisible to the public.

For more video clips and photos of the play and the documentary that grew out of it, please visit:

Excerpt from staged reading of the One-Act Play "Bits of Paradise: Kochiyama's Crusaders" by Marlan Warren with Ariel Kayoko Labasan at Rogue Machine Theatre (July 2017) featuring Labasan as human rights activist, Yuri Kochiyama, and Warren as a filmmaker who wants to document the little-recognized war effort of girls and women behind the barbed wire of the "Japanese American Internment" who called themselves "The Crusaders" as they embarked on a letter-writing campaign to boost the morale of the Japanese American soldiers who were fighting to prove patriotism while their families were held in U.S. concentration camps.

Warren adapted verbatim the letters and circulars sent out to "any soldier missing a letter" (the en masse correspondence was all written by Yuri) from The Crusaders scrapbooks in the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo, Los Angeles, and the Japanese American Museum of San Jose.

Videographer: Michael J. Labasan

These scenes from the play will be integrated into Warren's documentary film, "What did you do in the War, Mama?: Kochiyama's Crusaders" -- currently in post production.

NOTE: This show was also performed as a benefit for Founders Metropolitan Community Church at the invitation of Rev. Kevin Downer and FMCC Board. (July 2017).

[This play was originally produced in 2008 at The Marsh in a Reader's Theater version, "Bits of Paradise" by Marlan Warren.] Director: Marlan Warren Producers: Marlan Warren and Ariel Kayoko Labasan Special Thanks to Rogue Machine Theatre (Hollywood, CA) and to Founders Metropolitan Community Church (Los Angeles).

Cast: Ariel Kayoko Labasan............Yuri Kochiyama and Mary Nakahara
Douglas N. Hachiya..............Bill Kochiyama & Various Soldiers of 442nd Infantry
Jacky Jung..............Various Crusaders
Zoe Jean Kim..........Various Crusaders
Scott Shima............Various Soldiers of 442nd Infantry
Mack Wei...............Various Soldiers of 442nd Infantry
Marlan Warren.......Filmmaker
Theater Sound: Amanda Bierbauer (Tech) and Roger Owens (Sound Design)
Website: http://bit.ly/2tSXRto
Facebook: @YuriKochiyamaPlay and @CrusadersFilm

"Better go and doublecross yourself / Turn tail and run / In sickness and in health / Something wicked this way comes..."

Monty Warren & The Friggin' Whatevers tune "Doublecrosses" was aired by Steve Kelly on his Kelly's Heroes show on Fylde Coast Radio (U.K.) on March 14, 2018. It was an honor to be included in the 2 hour / 48 song lineup! "Doublecrosses" was penned by Monty Warren and John Beemiller, for album #3: "Far Out Close Up." Monty Warren leads a motley group of "Whatevers" who hail from the South Florida / Raleigh, NC area -- all veteran musicians who just plain love rock 'n' roll. If you like us, won't you please get in touch or follow us? Here's some more info: Website: http://www.montywarren.com EPK: http://montywarrenmediakit.blogspot.com Facebook: @montywarrenandthefrigginwhatevers CD Baby: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/montywarrent..
. iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/tt/artist/mo... Video by Marlan Warren.

WOMEN'S MARCH REVISITED: Because Flicker deleted my photos on this blog

Because I didn't get out to the Women's March 2018, I'm posting the music video I made of the "first" Women's March that happened after Trump's "election." Music is by Monty Warren & The Friggin' Whatevers. Anger and Humor and Desire for Positive Change is by the wonderful people--women, men and children--who gave their all for Democracy.

Remember: "Power never concedes without a Demand. It never has and it never will."

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

L.A. Photo Blog

Master Au, Chinatown L.A.
Neuvo Generacion Mariachi

Archangel Raphael (LACMA)

Fumito Nagasu, Sushi Guy (Ai)

Ai Japanese Restaurant

Thursday, November 16, 2017


The Poem of YES

Gave up
Air pressure like an anvil
Forcing me to stop
Lie on floor
Wondering if my heart would stop
Cat there
Why go on?
If you can't stand the Heat...
Then what?
A show of hands, please.
Who fucking knows?
Just lying there
Pretending it was good for me.
Then it came to me
After how long I don't know
And I saw
My Week
had too many
No, you can't do that.
No, I should do that.
No, we don't want that.
No, because she hates us.
No, because we hate him.
No, because I'm afraid of you.
No, because I just

Then I remembered a text from my friend
sent from his favorite place on Earth:
"I am always happiest when I am here..."
And I felt what it feels like to feel free.
Even just for a moment.
Because you feel loved.
And you are giving love.
You are wanted. And you are glad to be wanted.

I thought, "I need to write this down."

I got up.
Outside rain.
Sun shining.
So so hot still.
But wet.

And the lady across the street
Watering her lawn.

But I made it back.
And I am not afraid anymore.

Marlan Warren, August 2017, Los Angeles, California

Monday, August 14, 2017

#WonderWoman Poem By Carolyn Howard-Johnson: "My Woman-of-Steel Brand"

My mother Trudy Warren 8 months pregnant right after Hurricane Donna, Ft. Myers, FL
Perhaps I am remiss in not posting current national events and my relation to them as they happen. A couple weeks ago, I posted this poem by the extraordinary California poet, Carolyn Howard-Johnson about her inner "Wonder Woman." Now with Hurricane Irma bearing down on my hometown of Ft. Myers, I can't help but recall this picture my father took of my mother hauling away the multitude of fallen branches from the banyan tree we shared with our neighbors' yard. Eight months pregnant with my brother Monty. Mom played the piano the whole time the hurricane raged around our 2-story clapboard house. The tin roof blew off our neighbors' home behind ours. And they came into our house for protection during the calm of the Eye.

A toast to all Wonder Women everywhere. May your praises always be sung for your beautiful warrior spirits and loving ways.

You Think You Know Me Well

By Carolyn Howard-Johnson

I am Wonder Woman. You may have known 

me so long you remember

my original star-studded skirt

a la 1942 or still sigh over that skirt metamorphosed
to a bias-cut bikini singing
a patriot’s song to the female derrière
That would have been the same time 
it became hard to tell if I was born
to empower little girls or to mesmerize 
boys--the big ones and the small.
If that’s what you think
when you hear my name,
you’ve clearly not internalized
the idea of cruel waxing demanded by today’s
experts on grooming. (You should know
I didn’t do that. Somehow I was never convinced. 
Tights were another matter. I wore
them proudly--my woman-of-steel
brand-- lasso-wielding woman,
woman who bounced bullets
from magic cuffs, woman who didn’t need
D-cup implants
spilling out of her lamé bustier. 

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Rogue Machine Theatre Hosts Staged Reading of Play by Marlan Warren with Ariel Kayoko Labasan

The work of the Crusaders, although obscure and unknown, was a means by which young people in confinement were able to prove that no physical boundaries could stop them from transcending beyond the 'barbed wires.' - Yuri Kochiyama (aka "Mary Nakahara")#YuriKochiyama
At the invitation of Rogue Machine Theatre in Hollywood, "Bits of Paradise: Kochiyama's Crusaders" will be presented as a staged reading on July 19 (3pm and 8pm) and July 20 (8pm). The play, by Marlan Warren in collaboration with Ariel Kayoko Labasan focuses on a women's movement founded by renowned human rights activist Yuri Kochiyama when she was known as 20-year old "Mary Nakahara" and incarcerated in U.S. concentration camps during World War II with her fellow Japanese Americans. Calling themselves "The Crusaders," the girls and women mobilized a morale-boosting letter-writing campaign that ensured that "any soldier missing a letter" would receive mail.

"The performances will be more 'staged' than 'reading,'" explained Warren, who co-produces with Labasan, and directs the play. "Some actors may not be holding scripts, and there will be action sequences, props and costumes."

Warren originally directed and produced "Bits of Paradise" as a Reader's Theater piece at The Marsh Theatre in San Francisco in 2008.

"Bits of Paradise places its footprint on the timeline of a much-needed theatrical examination of the Asian American journey."--Asian Week

Recently, the play was reworked and re-titled "Bits of Paradise: Kochiyama's Crusaders," after Warren joined forces with actor/playwright Ariel Kayoko Labasan, whose solo show, "Yuri Speaks Out!" played to packed houses at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. Labasan will reprise her role as Yuri Kochiyama, portraying the activist from ages 20 to 84.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

L.A. Playwright Marlan Warren's "Chasing Sangha" Featured at Athena Cats New Works Fest (4/8/17)

Los Angeles playwright Marlan Warren's play, "Chasing Sangha," has been selected for Athena Cats' New Works Festival of 10-Minute Plays, and will be performed as a staged reading Sat., April 8, at the City Garage in Santa Monica's Bergamot Station Arts Center. The event ties in with SWAN (Support Women Artists Now) Day.

"I'm thrilled Athena Cats invited me to be part of this afternoon of 10-minute plays," said Warren. "Athena Cats--with its focus on women playwrights and directors--is like a dream come true for me."

Athena Cats is the brainchild of playwrights/screenwriters Debbie Bolsky and Laurel Wetzork. This collective of Southern California area female playwrights and directors formed to bring unrepresented works written by women to the stage.

According to the Athena Cats website, the statistics for female playwrights are grim. Twenty-three percent of plays produced during the 2011-2014 season were written by women, according to a Female Playwrights Institute study.

"Our goal is to redress this imbalance," said Athena Cats co-founder Laurel Wetzork.

When Warren's one-act "Bits of Paradise" showcased at The Marsh in San Francisco, it received praise from "Asian Week":

"Based on letters written between Japanese American girls and women in the U.S. internment camps and Japanese American soldiers during World War II, Bits of Paradise places its footprint on the timeline of a much needed theatrical examination of the Asian American journey."

"Chasing Sangha" focuses on a Night in Hell in the California winter desert where two brand new women friends try to achieve mystical enlightenment according to a Shaman Certification course one of them is taking, but Murphy's Law comes along with them. "Sangha" refers to the Buddhist concept of finding strength and protection by bonding with like-minded people.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Spotlight on "Friggin' Whatever" Roots Rock Vet Ron DeSaram: "He even pees like Keith Richards!"

The year is 1980. In the photo that remains, Ron DeSaram can be seen bent over his guitar, massive hair flying in unruly waves against the night sky, anger written across his face in defiant happiness. He looks like he’s wearing all-white, but no way to be sure in this black & white action shot.

“That’s the night they shut the power down on us,” explains Ron, 37 years later, “July Fourth celebration in Lake Worth, Florida. Noise ordinance. Every time they’d tell us to turn the volume down, we’d turn it up.”
Ron DeSaram with his Les Paul Guitar [Photo by Greg Fontenot]

His wife, Nancy DeSaram, adds: “They turned off the power, started up the fireworks and then the palm tree next to the stage caught fire.”

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Tuesday, February 14, 2017


Happy Valentine's Day!

At last, I've figured out how to put my Flickr photos from the L.A. Women's March 2017 in a slider on this blog. My apologies that I have not figured out how to not have my other photos on here, which will be included in my documentary, "What did you do in the War, Mama?: Kochiyama's Crusaders."

The film is about human rights activist Yuri Kochiyama and the Women's Movement she started while behind the barbed wire of a Japanese American internment camp during World War II. The photos you'll see here that reflect that film are from a performance of the Purple Moon Project at the Japanese American National Museum and there's one of the wonderful woman we interviewed who was 11 years old when she participated in Yuri's movement.

The beginning photos are the March. I'm sure you'll figure it out.

"Power never concedes without a Demand. It never has and it never will."

Created with flickr slideshow.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Yuri Kochiyama Interview 2009 Segment: "What did you do in the War, Mama...

For the first time since I've been working on this film (since Dec 2008) I was finally able to find a way to post a segment to YouTube (7 min.) that shows the actual video. Very grateful to the Movie Maker software I've been able to put onto this aging computer--although there's no way for me to actually edit the footage yet., This helps anyone who is interested or has donated $ to see what the film would include. Here Yuri at age 87 reads missives from the correspondence campaign she led at age 20 from behind the barbed wire of a U.S. concentration camp, to lift the morale of soldiers and in so doing, lift the morale of herself and the women & girls who participated during their World War II incarceration. Won't you please take a look, leave a comment, donate or whatever moves you to do. Thank you! Many blessings! 
Movie Website:

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